Configuring a reverse proxy

6 min

The main reason to add a reverse proxy in front of Garage is to provide TLS to your users and serve multiple web services on port 443.

In production you will likely need your certificates signed by a certificate authority. The most automated way is to use a provider supporting the ACME protocol such as Let's Encrypt, ZeroSSL or Buypass Go SSL.

If you are only testing Garage, you can generate a self-signed certificate to follow the documentation:

openssl req \
    -new \
    -x509 \
    -keyout /tmp/garage.key \
    -out /tmp/garage.crt \
    -nodes  \
    -subj "/C=XX/ST=XX/L=XX/O=XX/OU=XX/CN=localhost/emailAddress=X@X.XX" \
    -addext "subjectAltName = DNS:localhost, IP:127.0.0.1"

cat /tmp/garage.key /tmp/garage.crt > /tmp/garage.pem

Be careful as you will need to allow self signed certificates in your client. For example, with minio, you must add the --insecure flag. An example:

mc ls --insecure garage/

socat (only for testing purposes)

If you want to test Garage with a TLS frontend, socat can do it for you in a single command:

socat \
"openssl-listen:443,\
reuseaddr,\
fork,\
verify=0,\
cert=/tmp/garage.pem" \
tcp4-connect:localhost:3900

Nginx

Nginx is a well-known reverse proxy suitable for production. We do the configuration in 3 steps: first we define the upstream blocks ("the backends") then we define the server blocks ("the frontends") for the S3 endpoint and finally for the web endpoint.

The following configuration blocks can be all put in the same /etc/nginx/sites-available/garage.conf. To make your configuration active, run ln -s /etc/nginx/sites-available/garage.conf /etc/nginx/sites-enabled/. If you directly put the instructions in the root nginx.conf, keep in mind that these configurations must be enclosed inside a http { } block.

And do not forget to reload nginx with systemctl reload nginx or nginx -s reload.

Exposing the S3 endpoints

First, we need to tell to nginx how to access our Garage cluster. Because we have multiple nodes, we want to leverage all of them by spreading the load. In nginx, we can do that with the upstream directive.

Then in a server directive, we define the vhosts, the TLS certificates and the proxy rule.

A possible configuration:

upstream s3_backend {
  # if you have a garage instance locally
  server 127.0.0.1:3900;
  # you can also put your other instances
  server 192.168.1.3:3900;
  # domain names also work
  server garage1.example.com:3900;
  # you can assign weights if you have some servers 
  # that are more powerful than others
  server garage2.example.com:3900 weight=2;
}

server {
  listen [::]:443 http2 ssl;

  ssl_certificate     /tmp/garage.crt;
  ssl_certificate_key /tmp/garage.key;

  # You need multiple server names here:
  #  - s3.garage.tld is used for path-based s3 requests
  #  - *.s3.garage.tld is used for vhost-based s3 requests
  server_name s3.garage.tld *.s3.garage.tld;

  location / {
    proxy_pass http://s3_backend;
    proxy_set_header X-Forwarded-For $proxy_add_x_forwarded_for;
    proxy_set_header Host $host;
  }
}

Exposing the web endpoint

To better understand the logic involved, you can refer to the Exposing buckets as websites section. Otherwise, the configuration is very similar to the S3 endpoint. You must only adapt upstream with the web port instead of the s3 port and change the server_name and proxy_pass entry

A possible configuration:

upstream web_backend {
  server 127.0.0.1:3902;
  server 192.168.1.3:3902;
  server garage1.example.com:3902;
  server garage2.example.com:3902 weight=2;
}

server {
  listen [::]:443 http2 ssl;

  ssl_certificate     /tmp/garage.crt;
  ssl_certificate_key /tmp/garage.key;

  # You need multiple server names here:
  #  - *.web.garage.tld is used for your users wanting a website without reserving a domain name
  #  - example.com, my-site.tld, etc. are reserved domain name by your users that chose to host their website as a garage's bucket
  server_name *.web.garage.tld example.com my-site.tld;

  location / {
    proxy_pass http://web_backend;
    proxy_set_header X-Forwarded-For $proxy_add_x_forwarded_for;
    proxy_set_header Host $host;
  }
}

Apache httpd

@TODO

Traefik v2

We will see in this part how to set up a reverse proxy with Traefik.

Here is a basic configuration file:

[entryPoints]
  [entryPoints.web]
    address = ":80"

  [entryPoints.websecure]
    address = ":443"

[certificatesResolvers.myresolver.acme]
  email = "your-email@example.com"
  storage = "acme.json"
  [certificatesResolvers.myresolver.acme.httpChallenge]
    # used during the challenge
    entryPoint = "web"

Add Garage service

To add Garage on Traefik you should declare a new service using its IP address (or hostname) and port:

[http.services]
  [http.services.my_garage_service.loadBalancer]
    [[http.services.my_garage_service.loadBalancer.servers]]
      url = "http://xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx"
      port = 3900

It's possible to declare multiple Garage servers as back-ends:

[http.services]
    [[http.services.my_garage_service.loadBalancer.servers]]
      url = "http://xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx"
      port = 3900
    [[http.services.my_garage_service.loadBalancer.servers]]
      url = "http://yyy.yyy.yyy.yyy"
      port = 3900
    [[http.services.my_garage_service.loadBalancer.servers]]
      url = "http://zzz.zzz.zzz.zzz"
      port = 3900

Traefik can remove unhealthy servers automatically with a health check configuration:

[http.services]
  [http.services.my_garage_service.loadBalancer]
    [http.services.my_garage_service.loadBalancer.healthCheck]
      path = "/"
      interval = "60s"
      timeout = "5s"

Adding a website

To add a new website, add the following declaration to your Traefik configuration file:

[http.routers]
  [http.routers.my_website]
    rule = "Host(`yoururl.example.org`)"
    service = "my_garage_service"
    entryPoints = ["web"]

Enable HTTPS access to your website with the following configuration section (documentation):

...
    entryPoints = ["websecure"]
    [http.routers.my_website.tls]
      certResolver = "myresolver"
...

Adding gzip compression

Add the following configuration section to compress response using gzip before sending them to the client:

[http.routers]
  [http.routers.my_website]
    ...
    middlewares = ["gzip_compress"]
    ...
[http.middlewares]
  [http.middlewares.gzip_compress.compress]

Add caching response

Traefik's caching middleware is only available on entreprise version, however the freely-available Souin plugin can also do the job. (section to be completed)

Complete example

[entryPoints]
  [entryPoints.web]
    address = ":80"

  [entryPoints.websecure]
    address = ":443"

[certificatesResolvers.myresolver.acme]
  email = "your-email@example.com"
  storage = "acme.json"
  [certificatesResolvers.myresolver.acme.httpChallenge]
    # used during the challenge
    entryPoint = "web"

[http.routers]
  [http.routers.my_website]
    rule = "Host(`yoururl.example.org`)"
    service = "my_garage_service"
    middlewares = ["gzip_compress"]
    entryPoints = ["websecure"]

[http.services]
  [http.services.my_garage_service.loadBalancer]
    [http.services.my_garage_service.loadBalancer.healthCheck]
      path = "/"
      interval = "60s"
      timeout = "5s"
    [[http.services.my_garage_service.loadBalancer.servers]]
      url = "http://xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx"
    [[http.services.my_garage_service.loadBalancer.servers]]
      url = "http://yyy.yyy.yyy.yyy"
    [[http.services.my_garage_service.loadBalancer.servers]]
      url = "http://zzz.zzz.zzz.zzz"

[http.middlewares]
  [http.middlewares.gzip_compress.compress]

Caddy

Your Caddy configuration can be as simple as:

s3.garage.tld, *.s3.garage.tld {
	reverse_proxy localhost:3900 192.168.1.2:3900 example.tld:3900
}

*.web.garage.tld {
	reverse_proxy localhost:3902 192.168.1.2:3900 example.tld:3900
}

admin.garage.tld {
	reverse_proxy localhost:3903
}

But at the same time, the reverse_proxy is very flexible. For a production deployment, you should read its documentation as it supports features like DNS discovery of upstreams, load balancing with checks, streaming parameters, etc.

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